How To Build A Motorcycle In Scrap Mechanic
(Last Updated On: May 4, 2016)

Folks that enjoy playing Axolot’s Scrap Mechanic might find that it’s a bit hard to build an actual two-wheeled motorcycle that can drive straight and make turns. A new build of a somewhat sleek two-wheeled motorcycle has surfaced up, and the mechanics and blueprints for its working design are revealed.

For those looking to keep their two-wheel drive stable while making turns on Scrap Mechanic, look no further. YouTuber Blitzkriegler has a nice long video showing how to build it, drive it and how to control a moving and turning motorcycle across various types of ground.

To start things off, first put down a lift and place over it a metal sheet that is shaped like a U. Placing a controller on the inner part of the U-shaped metal piece inside of it will help produce a 30 degree angle fork for turning. You can catch this part in the video below at 3:35.

Next you will need to connect an engine to the back of the controller, which sits in the back part of the U-shaped metal piece. You will need to place two sideways pipe parts that allow longer pipes to connect on the opposite side end of the engine and controller so that you can turn while driving. This part can be seen in the video below at 4:28.

From here you will need to build out the front part of the bike, which will have two smaller turn-pipe pieces facing inwards. Afterwards, you will need to select more pipes that create a Y shape connecting to the two parts curving inwards. It’s best to watch that part in action at 5:15.

Extending the front piece out you will need to put a bearing near the tail end of the Y-shaped piece that lets it go down in an angle, and a pipe will need to be placed after it leading down and facing outward. On this part of the bike, you will need a bearing on the end of the outward pipe so that it can turn left or right, which is shown in the video at the 5:35 mark.

After placing the bearing for left or right handling, you will need to place a U-shaped pipe piece opposite of the one on the back, which holds the engine and controller. This should be connected to the end of the Y-shaped part. The front tire should be connected to a bearing on the left of the pipe. You can catch this part at 6:05.

Taking it back to the mid part of the U metal piece, the two long parts connected to the side should have two bearings on them with two smaller pieces facing upwards attached to them. These two long pipes will help keep it stable for turning. You can watch this segment at 6:57.

Next to the safety guards for turning should be two small pipes turned upwards on the back of the metal U piece. These two parts should be touching the engine. build the two parts upwards and out so that the back wheel will have something to connect to, similar to the front U-shaped wheel piece. You can watch him place these parts on at 7:39.

At the end of the two pieces dangling in mid-air should be connected with two Short Suspension parts. At the bottom of the suspension tips should be two small pipes turned inwards for the wheel to attach to. And like the front wheel, a bearing should be placed on the left side of the pipe for the wheel. You can watch this part at 8:07.

Place the driver seat on the top of the U-shaped metal piece, and connect the controller on the back to the Y-shaped controller bearing to 30 (in the red zone, not blue). From here, you can connect the bearing at the end of the Y-shaped piece to the steering wheel, while the engine must be connected to the inner bearing near the front and back wheels and the steering wheel. This can all be seen at 8:57.

Placing another controller at the bottom of the first controller, while the lift is up, will help with the two side-pipes to be actual support beams for keeping the motorcycle stable. Connect both the support pipe bearings to the second controller so that you can operate them for keeping balance, and then connect it to the steering wheel. You can watch this at 10:04.

You will need to place two levers on the back of the tips of the U-shaped metal piece. Connect the first lever to the first top controller, while the second lever to the bottom controller. In the end, the two levers should be connected to the steering wheel. All of this can be seen at 11:19.

Lastly, both pipes should be set at 90 degrees so that they can extend, and then set the engine power to the mid-part a little below high to make it run properly. Obviously, it still has some issues here and there, but nonetheless it works. You can watch the motorcycle drive and make turns at 14:29, courtesy of Blitzkriegler, or you can watch the whole video from beginning to end for a better scope.

Scrap Mechanic is currently available on Steam Early Access for $19.99. If you want to learn more about the game, or devs you can hit up their official site.


Ads (learn more about our advertising policies here)




About

Ethan was born in glitches, and pursues to find the most game breaking glitches in games. If you need to get in touch use the Contact Page.