Suicide Squad’s Final Trailer Finally Pulls Something Cohesive Together
(Last Updated On: July 19, 2016)

I’m willing to watch pretty much any movie by David Ayer. The guy drops the hammer of emotions and tension on a film like Brian Williams drops heavy fibs as a war journalist. The latest and final trailer for Suicide Squad brings the story together in a way that’s almost somewhat cohesive.

I think the trailer works well because it centers on Amanda Waller, the mastermind behind the Suicide Squad project. We finally have some sort of tie linking everyone and everything together that adds suspense and drama that was previously missing from the other trailers. We have your axis of evil in the Joker and whatever those evil army things are, and we have the devil’s allies in the form of Amanda Waller’s Suicide Squad. It’s like a chess game being played with bullets, guns, knives and pieces made out of the mentally insane. Conceptually, I love it.

You can check out the trailer below from ComicBook.com, which offers viewers a minute long look at the upcoming film.

The trailer finally veers away from Will Smith and Margot Robbie, the two who seem to take up the most space in the promotional ads, and it instead puts the focus on Waller and Rick Flag, the two heading up the “good guy” portion of the Suicide Squad. Flag, played by Joel Kinnaman, is the straight-laced military veteran leading the team into the firefight. Waller is the one giving the commands.

The uneasy relationship between the two is captured nearly perfectly within the span of just a minute. However, despite the general story arc now having some cohesion, the relationship between the other characters seems lacking.

I could be very wrong but I get the feeling that a lot of the character development for certain people will just be nil. It seems like the sort of film where plenty of characters will just not get enough screen time and others will get too much. Again, I could be wrong but that’s just what’s been indicated by the trailers.

Suicide Squad

Ayer managed to flesh out most of the characters in the film Sabotage, so he knows his way around ensemble casts. However, the problem with Sabotage was a lack of proper direction and sloppy pacing. Fury managed to nail the pacing and action, but character development was kind of thin beyond Pitt’s character and Lerman’s character.

Ultimately? I’m scared for Suicide Squad. It has potential if Ayer was given room to breathe with his creative juices (and if he was given enough runtime to work with), but coming off the sloppy release of Batman v Superman, I’m not holding my breath.

For now I get the impression that Suicide Squad is a film fighting with itself. We’ll see how it all comes together when it releases in a couple of weeks on August 5th.


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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.

  • Hawk Hopper

    I really liked Fury and Sabotage. I know people hate the nastiness and hatefulness in both films, especially Sabotage. “You can’t have a movie about corrupt cops that kill innocent people and a sleazy Schwarzenegger!” it seemed like they were screaming. But I love that kind of stuff.

    I have no interest in Suicide Squad other than Ayer directing it.

    • The nastiness is what I loved about both films. Fury was grit on grit and did not give any f*&ks about it. Sabotage was at its best when it was cold and cruel. The biggest problem with Sabotage was that it was a film that seemed to have identity issues, and the pacing just got really messed up when it was trying to be a police procedural.

      When Ayer is just let loose, like with Harsh Times and End of Watch, he nails it. I don’t know how much room Warner Bros., gave him here but the film has looked really inconsistent and incoherent in one too many trailers to give me confidence in its quality.