UK’s Conservative Manifesto Wants To Censor Internet Porn, Hate Speech, Online Bullying
UK Censorship
(Last Updated On: May 20, 2017)

United Kingdom’s Prime Minister Theresa May wants to roll out a new manifesto for a post-Brexit Britain that aligns with very strict Conservative values. The 88 page manifesto runs through a few notable tools that the U.K., government was to employ to help safeguard its citizens, including enforcing ISPs and data acquisition firms to relinquish or delete information held about individuals when they turn 18.

While that might not seem like a bad thing at all, RT delved deeper into the manifesto, which has some striking language that will affect all of the U.K’s residents when it comes to access digital content online.

The most egregious clauses regarding the infringement of internet freedoms starts on page 80, which you can read over on the official Conservative website, where it states…

”We will work with industry to introduce new protections for minors, from images of pornography, violence, and other age-inappropriate content not just on social media but in app stores and content sites as well. We will put a responsibility on industry not to direct users – even unintentionally – to hate speech, pornography, or other sources of harm. We will make clear the responsibility of platforms to enable the reporting of inappropriate, bullying, harmful, or illegal content, with take-down on a comply-or-explain basis.”

Essentially this would mean that the U.K., government would have carte blanche control over the internet in terms of what can be viewed by users, what can be posted by content publishers, and what appears in search engines, social media, and content delivery systems.

As pointed out by RT.com, this Conservative institution would also be able to enact sanctions against those who defy their rulings, or if they choose not to take down the content after their explanation for hosting said content is denied by the content overseers from the U.K’s ruling body.

For example, if they think that certain images from a certain game may be too risque for minors, they can have the site (or search engine) take down the content or face stiff penalties.

Another interesting thing that’s part of the Conservative Manifesto for 2017 is that they will be advocating for more press freedoms to hold them less responsible for the liability of costs during libel cases.

On page 82 of the manifesto, under the “A Free Media” section, it stats…

“At a time when the internet is changing the way people obtain their news, we also need to take steps to protect the reliability and objectivity of information that is essential to our democracy and a free independent press. We will ensure content creators are approprirately rewarded for the content they make available online. We will be consistent in our approach to regulation of online and offline media.”

They cite that they will also not be pursuing the second stage of the Leveson Inquiry regarding the examination and investigation of press ethics that took place back in 2011 after various incidents of unethical means of information acquisition came under scrutiny by Parliament. The second part of the inquiry never got underway and the Conservative party would axe any pursuant means to see it through.

In addition to not continuing the investigation into media ethics and press practices, the manifesto also states…

“We will repeal section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2014, which, if enacted, would force media organisations to become members of a flawed regulatory system or risk having to pay the legal costs of both sides in libel and privacy cases, even if they win.”

This refers to the “Publishers of news-related material: damages and costs” section in the Crime and Courts Act, which you can view over on the official U.K., government legislation website.

This act currently makes it where unless otherwise determined by arbitration or the court, media outlets accused of libel must pay the court fees. In a way, it prevents British media outlets from overstepping the bounds or else risk ending up in court, and paying fees whether they win or lose the case.

Regardless of the sweeping changes made in the manifesto, there’s no word yet on how this would affect websites outside of the U.K., that provides content that runs afoul of their proposed regulations for the internet.


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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.