E-Sports Infographic Chronicles Early Rise And Potential Growth By 2019
Brief History of eSports
(Last Updated On: October 11, 2017)

An infographic chronicling the brief history of e-sports and the burgeoning market surrounding competitive gaming in the tournament scene was put together by Computer Planet. The infographic starts way back in 1972 and attempts to offer projections for what the market for e-sports might look like in 2019.

The lengthy piece covers everything from the old days of LAN tournaments, to televised events like Starcade, which took place between 1982 and 1984, showcasing players attempting to best each other’s scores in old-school arcade games.

The infographic jumps ahead to the golden age of gaming between the 1990s, where the Nintendo World Championships were a thing, the MSN Gaming Zone was on the rise, and paid services like Ten and MPlayer were the dominate form of playing PC games online for about $10 a month.

The infographic gives a nod to Blockbuster Video, who used to host the World Game Championships, which was an invitational that allowed gamers from all over the globe to compete.

The infographic then moves up through the MLG era during the early aughts, and eventually tackles the rise of Riot Games’ League of Legends, which was just recently making headlines for one of the developers in charge of curbing toxicity was fired for being toxic.

Nevertheless, it’s hard to deny the influence that Riot’s League of Legends has had on both the MOBA genre and the e-sports field. We’ve seen a massive boon in competitive gamers becoming professional digital athletes, and this is where the infographic starts rolling out salaries and figures being paid out in the top e-sports titles.

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive has awarded more than £18,988,810 across 1946 tournaments; where-as League of Legends has poured out £29,150,640 across 1766 tournaments; the classic Counter-Strike has paid out £8,621,720 across 572 tournaments; StarCraft II has filled the coffers of 1588 players with £16,909,794 across 3929 tournaments; and Dota 2 has had an impressive payout of £70,192,464 from just 645 tournaments.

According to the infographic, it cites stats from NewZoo claiming that the digital sporting market will reach on average 215 million by 2019. The market firm expects revenue to exceed $1 billion by 2019.

However, if the gaming media and publishers continue to attack their audience regarding sociopolitical agendas while also bombarding them with anti-consumer practices, it’s unlikely that certain games will see the growth as projected by analysts. You can check out the full infographic below.

computer-planet eSports infographic


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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.