PUBG Dev Apologizes To SJWs, Vows To Remove Camel Toe From Female Model
PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds - Cameltoe
(Last Updated On: December 11, 2017)

PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds’ creative director, Brendan Greene, finally chimed in after the SJW circles on Twitter attacked the developers at Bluehole Studios for including what some of them perceived to be a camel toe on the female player model. Female developers and white knights who adhere to the rules of intersectionality and SocJus, complained about the models in PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds all day long, swelling up thousands of tweets across Twitter until Greene was made aware of the nontroversy.

Eventually Greene responded by saying that the latest update containing the normal map for the female model was “outsourced” and that the team would be removing the camel toe.

If you’re unable to view the tweet, Greene states…

“After looking into this, it appears it came as part of the character model we received from an outsourcer when we first started the project. The file itself has not been changed in 2 years. It will be updated shortly with changes! Sorry for any offense caused!”

Jennifer Scheurle is the creative director at Opaque Space, an indie outlet working on a VR app. And essentially, what Scheurle says is true about it not showing up in the actual game. You can’t see it normally and even when you take the character’s pants off with a 1440p resolution, you still can’t see it. And so long as you’re wearing pants in game, you still won’t be able to see it, as indicated in the image below.

The brouhaha kicked up thanks to a Reddit post made on December 9th, 2017, where users joked about spotting camel toe after doing an extreme close-up and zoom-in on the female model in the latest test server package for Bluehole Studios’ PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds.

Social Justice Warriors rallied around the image, complaining about the perceived appearance of a camel toe on the female models.

The thing is, you couldn’t actually see it in the main game without using certain kinds of camera techniques and manipulation to spot the so-called camel toe. In fact, it was only somewhat visible using Umodel and certain lighting conditions in Blender. Even still, the perception of a camel toe in PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds was enough to make Social Justice Warriors get vastly offended at the idea of underwear being that tight on the female characters.

Real gamers who actually bought and played the game really couldn’t care less, but as we all know, the industry bows to the Social Justice Warriors for whatever whims that weds their outrage.

For the people who asked what was so bad about it, Schuerle claimed that in real life camel toes (like wedgies) hurt, and therefore the game should be more like real life and not allow camel toes to be present.

Given that Greene is the creative director on the project, he’s above and beyond the standard artist and designer at Bluehole Studios, for the latter likely would have ignored such an insignificant complaint.

(Thanks for the news tip Kyuryon)


Ads (learn more about our advertising policies here)



About

Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.