Ubisoft Admits To Rewriting History In Assassin’s Creed: Origins To Avoid Historical Sexism
Assassin's Creed Origins Discovery Tour Censorship
(Last Updated On: February 21, 2018)

Ubisoft committed two major sins with one stone by releasing Assassin’s Creed: Origins Discovery Tour. They censored all the nude statues featured in the mode, as well as admitted to rewriting history as a way prioritize “inclusive gameplay” over “historical sexism”.

YouTuber Censored Gaming did a quick two minute video on the censorship incident, which you can check out below.

All the statues and art have been censored, and Ubisoft released a statement explaining why…

“Discovery Tour Was created to offer the maximum amount of people from various ages and cultural backgrounds the ability to visit the long lost world of Ancient Egypt and learn about its history. We worked hand in hand with educators and academic institutions to tailor the content to be suited for every audience, including younger students, taking into account cultural sensitivities that can be different from one country to another.”

A lot of gamers who happen to be fans of history were not at all pleased with the censorship of the statues, as they believe that art should not be censored or altered in anyway.

Some of the original art, however, still appears in the tour uncensored, just not the in-game statues. This is made evident with the tour showcasing the nude statue of Spartacus in Rome as well as nudes in a painting featuring Cleopatra, which you can view below courtesy of YouTuber xTGE.


However, an even bigger sin was committed by Ubisoft that was spotted by French developer Tim Soret – the developer who apologized to Anita Sarkeesian for not supporting her brand of feminism and the current designer of the cyberpunk pixel game, The Last Night – tweeted out images that revealed that Ubisoft admitted to rewriting history in Assassin’s Creed: Origins.

The striking point of the last photo – one of an ancient kalpis from 5th century BCE featured in the British Museum in London, England, has a bit of dialogue describing its context in the game. The sub-header is called “Inclusive Gameplay” relating to how education in Alexandria was depicted within Assassin’s Creed: Origins. The text states…

“Here both girls and boys are shown attending a class given by one of the rhetoricians of the era.


“The team made the choice to show both genders attending class within the context of the game world. Even though it is historically inaccurate, the team felt it was not necessary to prioritize historical sexism over inclusive gameplay.”

Rewriting history to avoid the act of prioritizing “historical sexism” is literally historical revisionism for the sake of sociopolitical propaganda.

Ubisoft is basically admitting that they’re using the game to inculcate people with certain kinds of false historical elements to socially re-engineer the way they think about history, all for the sake of pushing the intersectional ideology of “inclusiveness”.

We now have companies who don’t mind changing context and historical accuracy in order to fit their own ideologies they are attempting to force on gamers.

Many also noticed this with the purposeful inclusion of miscegenation in the brothels of Assassin’s Creed: Origins via the paintings on the wall. It was spotted in a Reddit thread, where they discussed the art depicted in the game, which you can view below by clicking through the link.

Many gamers were not at all pleased with Ubisoft’s attempts at forcibly politicizing the game, especially during these times where race relations are nearly at an all time low.

This act combined with the rewriting of history for ideological purposes shows that Ubisoft has a very clear agenda that they’re trying to push through their Assassin’s Creed series.

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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.