Cyberpunk 2077 Eurogamer Interview Focuses On Gay Sex, Gender-Fluidity, And Pronouns
Cyberpunk 2077

In a recent interview that CD Projekt Red senior quest designer, Philipp Weber, had with Eurogamer that was published on August 24th, 2018, it covered a number of topics, including being able to leave Night City and venture beyond the walls, some elements of the character creator, and how the game is adapting to gender-fluidity along with featuring gay sex/relationships.

In the interview, Eurogamer notes that in the recent demo that was showcased the male protagonist was on display, and that at the start of the demo the player character wakes up after presumably having sex with another man. Weber notes that these kind of relationships are in Cyberpunk 2077, saying…

“In this demo at least you will always wake up to another man, so we can show different kinds of relationships will be part of the game, and players will be able to choose what kind of character they want to play.”

In the previous demo the main character, named ‘V’, was a female, so when she woke up she was next to man. Weber doesn’t say whether or not having sexual relations with another man is mandatory or not, as that could be a defining point on whether some people buy the game or skip out on it.

Later on in the interview the focus shifts to the character creator and making characters. Eurogamer presses on whether or not gender-fluid options will be available, and Weber responded by saying…

“You know, as an example in the character creation you can do that by not calling the type of body you choose ‘man’ or ‘woman’, but just title it ‘body type’. And then from a male or female body type you can on this basis choose how to make your character.”

Eurogamer presses even further about whether or not CD Projekt Red will be using gendered pronouns for the character creation, or whether it will allow for options across what Liberals call the “gender spectrum”.

Weber dodges the question by saying that the team isn’t saying.

Eurogamer keeps pressing, though, and the asks if having different pronoun options will be in the game, and Weber responds by saying…

“I honestly don’t know yet. What I can say was that it was a part of Cyberpunk 2020 but how exactly we’ll do it in Cyberpunk 2077 I don’t know yet. But it is definitely a thing we are aware of.”

In the final exchange regarding gender pronouns and gender fluidity, Eurogamer’s Tom Philips engages in the following exchange…

Eurogamer: I know plenty of fans who would appreciate that, and after all, you have a main character with a name that doesn’t specify any gender.

 

Weber: Well exactly. That’s why we chose that name, because V works for male, works for female and we thought it would be a good option…

 

Eurogamer:…for gender fluid as well?

 

Weber: Yeah.”

The rest of the interview finally focused on elements of the gameplay, including net-running,  cyber-psychosis and the size and scope of Night City.

Nevertheless, most normal people were pretty disappointed with how CD Projekt seems to be heavily focusing the sociopolitical aspects around what Social Justice Warriors want out of the game. For anyone not in the know, the SJW ethos is themed around societal degeneracy and mental illness.

Now some people might say that Weber had to be courtesy to Eurogamer and provide PR friendly answers, but he very well could have simply said that they’re not focusing on gender-fluidity and left it at that. There’s also a such thing as saying “No”.

Overall, this paints a rather grim picture for the direction of Cyberpunk 2077, especially in combination with the fact that CD Projekt recently apologized to SJWs for making a joke about assuming someone’s gender, and before that the company’s subsidiary, GOG.com, apologized on multiple occasions for tweets they made that SJWs didn’t like.

The company definitely seems to have a preference in who they’re attempting to court based on their social media behavior, and what’s been said in recent interviews.

In fact, back on June 13th, 2018, in an interview with Gamasutra, quest designer Patrick Mills explained that the company is consciously attempting to remove or alter anything in Cyberpunk 2077 that someone might deem offensive, saying…

“Very often, we see something [that may be offensive to players] and we say ‘that’s great, but, think about the larger context here.’ We have to be willing to make mistakes, and then fix those mistakes and be aware,” explains Mills. “We have to talk to people, we have to do our research, it’s an ongoing process and we’re always trying to do a good job with it.”

 

“[…] This is a Polish studio, and so sometimes there are things that, someone will put in, that they don’t know the American context of it. They understand it in a Polish context, but not realizing in an American context it would be seen very very differently.”

 

“[…] What’ll happen is, someone will notice something…we have people who say ‘hold on, are you sure about this? And sometimes it involves going to QA and saying ‘hey, if you see this particular thing, let us know. We’re not doing this thing. This is something we’re not going to do.'”

So don’t expect any groundbreaking commentary about anything in the game if it’s being designed around the sensibilities of people who could become easily offended. Coupled with the fact that the team seems to be designing around the structure of “gender fluidity”, a Liberal social construct that they teach in universities, it’s looking as if Cyberpunk 2077 is being designed mostly with Leftists in mind.

(Thanks for the news tip totenglocke)


Ads (learn more about our advertising policies here)

About

Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!