Sabotage Removed Joke From The Messenger Following Complaints From SJW Journalists
The Messenger SJWs

Sabotage’s The Messenger made its way onto the market recently, featuring a mixture of both 8-bit and 16-bit gameplay. The unique setup allowed it to capture the attention of gamers and critics alike, for which it garnered positive feedback. However, the developers decided to remove one joke from the game from a shop keeper who quipped “Did you just assume my banter?”.

According to a retrospective on the game from GamesIndustry.biz, the article states…

“[…] A pre-release build of the game sent to journalists included a scene where the slightly obnoxious shopkeeper character asks, “Did you just assume my banter?” It’s an attempted play on “Did you just assume my gender?” a question typically used as a transphobic joke. Someone pointed this out to Sabotage, and Brouard said the team quickly changed it before launch.”

Journalists have been turning everything into “problematic” language, so much so that developers now have to tip-toe around every single little thing they implement into their game.

GamesIndustry.biz notes that had the developer not changed it, there would have been a likelihood that propagandists in the media would have castigated the developers and turned it into a public lynching, as they’ve done in the past to many other developers for who made jokes…

“That incident could conceivably have touched off a charged public argument that could have become the main story surrounding The Messenger’s launch, but because of Sabotage’s quick and decisive action, the line was barely a blip on the radar, largely ignored amidst a wave of glowing reviews.”

According to Sabotage’s co-founder, Martin Brouard, even having one person complain was enough for them to remove the line from the game to sate the feelings of those who stir agitprop through social media polemics when developers don’t kowtow to the media’s Left-wing politics.

Brouard had no problems sacrificing the creative integrity of the studio to placate the anti-gamers who call themselves “journalists”, telling GamesIndustry.biz…

“These are difficult times for a discussion sometimes. What it basically came to was somebody literally said, very politely, ‘You know what? This made me uncomfortable.’ And for me, it was like, ‘OK, that’s a good way of explaining to me that something we did made you feel uncomfortable. That’s not what we want.’ If it made one person uncomfortable from seeing a pre-release video, it means other people are going to be uncomfortable with that, and I don’t want that. We want the game to be as inclusive as possible. We want people to have fun, to remember how it was cool when they were kids playing games in their parents’ basement…

 

“For us, it was going to take two minutes to rewrite a line that’s going to be much better. It wasn’t a big problem to change it. It’s not as if we’re like, ‘Our artistic integrity has been destroyed!’ That’s not it at all.”

This has become a common occurrence for most developers, who almost always accommodate their beliefs and ingenuity to the perpetually offended after a conspectus of “problematic” content is rolled out by the members of the Intersectional Inquisition.

(Thanks for the news tip Rob)


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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.

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