Modded Warfare Hit With Community Strikes By Nintendo, YouTube Refuses To Explain What Guidelines Were Violated

Modded Warfare

Big tech continues to stifle, suppress, and silence content creators and users. The latest victim is Youtuber Modded Warfare; a content creator who uploads videos themed around modding consoles. However, he won’t be uploading any new videos for modded Nintendo Switches anytime soon due to multiple community strikes he received from YouTube on behalf of Nintendo. The worst part of it all? YouTube refuses to explain what guideline he violated.

On June 26th, 2019 Modded Warfare updated the community about the strikes he received on his channel, explaining across multiple tweets why he hadn’t uploaded any new videos over the course of two weeks, writing…

“If you’ve been wondering why I haven’t uploaded in over 2 weeks, my channel has been crippled by these false claims from Nintendo. Firstly I got another CTM complaint about Switch Tutorials #7 which resulted in a second community guideline strike…With two strikes your ability to upload is disabled until the strike is resolved or expires. I got in contact with YouTube & explained the situation to them. After waiting a week they have now re-enabled my ability to upload but they are refusing to remove the strikes…So I asked them, why are those videos deemed to be in violation of the community guidelines? If the videos really are in violation of guidelines then they should have no trouble pointing out which policy they are in violation of right? Here’s the response I got back.

 

[Image of e-mail]

 

“They are refusing to tell me why the videos violate the community guidelines, because they don’t violate the guidelines. YouTube is acting on the request of Nintendo to remove the video despite the video not breaking any of YouTube’s rules…This is the problem YouTubers face with YouTube right now. The rules are not clearly defined. Their stated policies are not the same as their internal policies. They don’t apply their rules equally and they consistently allow large companies to abuse creators without penalty…

 

“I had a few switch videos I was going to upload but now I don’t dare upload them encase I get another strike. As a precaution I’m privating all my switch videos until at least 1 of the strikes expires. You will be able to find my Switch Tutorial series over on BitChute…

 

“From now on all my future YouTube uploads will be backed up on BitChute and LBRY so if any videos are removed in future, you can always find them there. Please take the time to subscribe on those platforms if you want to continue to watch my content when YouTube gives me the boot”

Modded Warfare linked to the e-mail message from YouTube, which you can view below.

If you’re unable to read the message in the image, it states…

“We understand your concern about the actions taken against your account. We cannot provide you specific details on what guidelines your content has violated.

 

“Our actions are the result of careful investigation by our team of dedicated specialists. Though you might be disappointed with our decision, we are unable to reinstate your video.

 

“Let me know if there’s anything else.”

If you check his YouTube channel you’ll note that almost all of the Switch videos are now hidden from the public view. This is to prevent anymore strikes against his channel.

In a follow up tweet within the thread, Modded Warfare directs people to his Bitchute channel and Lbry page, where he’s moved his Switch tutorials for now.

There’s now an entire playlist of the Nintendo jailbreaking guides on the other channels, including instructions and tutorials on how to jailbreak a retail Switch, how to install games, how to use homebrew software, and how to install the Retroarch emulator.

There are even guides on how to install custom backgrounds and themes, multimedia players for the Switch, and even how to update the firmware.

It’s a smart move backing up all of the content on Bitchute because he’s right: his channel could go kaput at any moment on YouTube for the most innocuous of actions and inane of reasons.

YouTube, along with other big tech platforms, have been increasing their censorship lately to frightening degrees. People who used to be able to make money from said platforms are no longer able to, this has stretched all across the content creator board, from political commentators to video game enthusiasts.

But it doesn’t stop there.

Google has openly declared that they will be influencing and manipulating the elections in 2020. They’ve been shadow banning websites and censoring content in order to social engineer what people think and how they think. So far there doesn’t appear to be any end in sight with where this situation will go. Most people expect that a civil war is the only way to put a true stop to it, and people are now prepping for the worst.

(Thanks for the news tip Samet Chan)

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