Australia Looking Into Internet Porn Restrictions Based On U.K’s Failed Porn ID

Australia Porn ID

Australia is looking at the failed Porn ID initiative that the U.K., attempted to implement but ended up failing to follow through with due to technical limitations. Why is Australia looking at the failed U.K., system as a form of restricting access to porn websites and adult material? Because they’re thinking of the children, of course.

Australian outlet News.com.au is reporting that the Australian Parliament are investigating ways of implementing a new age restriction measure to prevent kids and teenagers from accessing pornography or adult material on the web.

The article explains what the Australian government is investigating in order to make their age verification system operable where the U.K., system failed…

“The UK proposed making users visiting porn sites prove they were 18. The government abandoned the plan in October after a series of major technical issues.

 

“The Australian report said three “crucial factors” needed to be sorted out to succeed where the UK scheme failed.

 

“These included ensuring a level playing field for regulation, making age verification easy for consumers to use and raising public awareness of the need for age verification.”

None of that addresses the issues that the U.K., government ran into with their Porn ID or AgeID initiative.

The main reason they buried the Porn ID plan was because there was no way to implement it without risking end-user privacy and/or identity theft. So in October of 2019 they put an end to wasting tax payer money on trying to restrict users from accessing whatever they want on the internet.

The U.K., never figured out how to technologically force people to prove that they were above age while not putting their security or privacy at risk, given that originally they wanted people to prove their identity by using their government issued ID, driver license, or credit card, but not only is there no way to prevent kids from simply using their parents’ ID to access adult websites but now anyone who hacks said security websites have access to all sorts of credit card and identity information.

The only partial solution that the U.K., proposed that they eventually walked back on was selling Porn ID access cards from high street retailers, which still doesn’t get around the fact that kids could still get their hands on these ID cards and access porn sites. And that’s also not to mention the burgeoning black market for ID cards that a system like that would create.

Australia doesn’t seem to be addressing the biggest hurdle that led to the U.K., abandoning the AgeID and instead are talking about level playing fields for regulation and public awareness.

The only thing they’re relying on is the panic over studies suggesting that parents with kids as young as two and as old as 17 were worried about their access to adult material online. The article also quotes some stats that the Australian government are taking into consideration, which reads…

“Advocacy group Collective Shout said UK research found 28 per cent children aged 11 to 12 had seen pornography online. In the 15 to 16 age group, the number jumped to 65 per cent.”

The comment section rightfully pointed out that the best way to prevent kids from seeing pornography online is by parents doing their jobs and preventing young kids from accessing devices with internet capabilities.

The ridiculous part about it is that this isn’t even the first time that the Australian government has taken aim at implementing such a measure. Just a month before the U.K., pulled the plug on the AgeID system, Australian politicians were already considering adopting the system.

(Thanks for the news tip Thunor)