Bear With Me Takes Players On An Imaginary Noir-Adventure Starting August 8th
(Last Updated On: July 14, 2016)

Exordium Games recently announced that their charming point-and-click, noir adventure game, Bear With Me, will release for PC on August 8th. It’s a black-and-white themed game set within the wildly imaginative mind of the protagonist who is desperately looking for her missing brother, all while being aided by her hard-nosed, gruff talking bear.

The game appears to be a mix of Sam & Max meets Dollman, but designed to take advantage of today’s pop cultural themes.

The family-friendly adventure stars the young protagonist named Amber, out looking for her missing brother. She’s aided in part by the grim, gruff and gravely-voiced stuffed bear named Ted E. Bear. While this all sounds like it’s fun and games and cuddly and cute, the game is actually aimed for a slightly older audience.

There’s a trailer that gives you exactly what you need to construct a formidable opinion on what to expect from Exordium Games’ title. Check it out below.

The game will take place across multiple episodes as not only will Amber need to seek out and find her missing brother, but she’ll also have to deal with the Red Man setting the world on fire.

Andrej Kovacevic, the game director at Exordium Games, commented about the upcoming release of the title, explaining a little bit about the themes and their goals for the game, saying in the press release…

“Bear With Me offers a classic point-and-click adventure with a dose of self-awareness; it revels in the genre’s trappings of absurd solutions and quirky characters and has a lot of fun with both,” […] “We also hope players find something within Bear With Me’s greater message that resonates and stays in their minds long after they finish playing.”

I’m now curious what that greater message is?

Bear With Me

Anyway, Bear With Me will feature a non-linear story where choices and interactions with certain characters will reap certain results… some of which might be good, others might be bad. Ultimately the game will have multiple endings to uncover, so there’s an element of replayability being implemented and hopefully they instill in players an interest in trying out different routes and possibilities to explore the game’s themes and world for more than one playthrough.

I think that’s always been the biggest drawback to most point-and-click adventure games… a lack of replayability.

You can check out the Steam store page to learn a little more about Bear With Me or visit the official website. And remember, the game is due for release next month on August 8th for PC and Mac.


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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.

  • LurkerJK

    I think that’s always been the biggest drawback to most point-and-click adventure games… a lack of replayability

    I have to disagree with that.

    Trying to artificially add random elements, combat, BS “choices”, backtracking, reuse of locations, reuse of characters/puzzles, laborious pixel hunting, illogical long ass puzzles and some other shit is whats wrecking these games. All these elements make them boring, there is rarely anything worth doing in these games other than furthering the story and all these elements act as barriers for that

    Imho, the problem is the price point, a handful of hours for about the price of 1 or 2 movie tickets with a tight sweet experience and no filler would work a lot better and leave room for sequels, they should be treated as disposable media the same way movies are

    Short and cheap episodic games were a good idea, sadly they screwed up by too much focus on selling “seasons” and making the waiting period too long, if you are going to use cliffhangers you need to deliver quickly before the hypeboner goes flacid, otherwise make the episodes self contained and lean on interesting characters/world building to sell the sequels