Origin Access Adds $29.99 Annual Subscription Option To Service
(Last Updated On: February 17, 2017)

Electronic Arts recently announced that they’ve added three new games to their Vault for their Origin Access service, including Aragami, the supernatural ninja stealth game; Furi, the awesome neon-violent hack-and-slash game; and The Saboteur, a classic open-world noir title from back when EA used to publish original games.

The notice also informs gamers that Origin Access has been updated with a new annual membership option. Instead of paying on a month-to-month basis, you can now pay an upfront fee of $29.99 for an entire year’s worth of service. To be honest, that’s not a bad price. Also to be honest, it’s still Electronic Arts… so… “hold the wallet”.

However, in order to get gamers to give up their wallet like a valedictorian gives up her virginity on prom night (well, that’s assuming she didn’t give it up beforehand in a bet not to enter prom night a virgin) EA also announced that they’ll be continuing with the seven day free trial for Origin Access. This will give gamers an opportunity to play-test games for free from EA’s Vault, as well as test out free trials of upcoming games, such as Mass Effect: Andromeda, or or take advantage of Origin store offers with a 10% discount.

All these subscription services to lure gamers into giving up their rights to own games in order to embrace the “all digital future” doesn’t set well with me. I know a lot of people have resolved to simply trust that game companies have their best interests in mind, but as proven with half-arsed services like PlayStation Now, it’s pretty obvious that once things start going a little sour, you can lose access to your games locked in the cloud (or a digital) vault like the snap of a finger or a journalist getting trigged after a PewDiePie video drops into their inbox.

Anyway, the three games are available in the Origin Access Vault right now, and the annual membership is also available right now. You can learn more by visiting the official Origin Access website.


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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.

3 comments Categories: News, PC Tags: , ,
  • Smug

    “All these subscription services to lure gamers into giving up their rights to own gamers in order to embrace the “all digital future” doesn’t set well with me. I know a lot of people have resolved to simply trust that game companies have their best interests in mind, but as proven with half-arsed services like PlayStation Now, it’s pretty obvious that once things start going a little sour, you can lose access to your games locked in the cloud (or a digital) vault like the snap of a finger ”

    which I hate on PSN because all the free DLCs i’ve gotten from download codes (and the rare dlcs I’ve bought) can simply disappear. I never bought a single digital game on Vita, but I also worry in a near future that the servers (to patch/updates the cartridges I’ve bought) wont be available anymore. Reprints like “The Best” dont give you a guarantee that you get a game patched to the latest version out of the box

    also it’s the main reason why I stopped using Steam (besides playing sometimes source mods) on PC. Not helped by the fact Valve is trying to bring back paid mods to wreak havoc into the mod communities just for the sake of shekels.

  • Gorgon

    I have to give them Titanfall 2, that is a legitimately good game. Battlefield 1 isn’t ban either.

    • Battlefield 1 is a visual marvel. I’m not fond of how much they removed from Battlefield 3 as far as gameplay mechanics are concerned. I do like that characters have animations for getting into and out of vehicles, though.

      And yeah… Respawn showed why they were worth the $1 billion when they were making the CoD games by returning to and evolving that formula with Titanfall 2.