E3 2017: Need For Speed Payback Videos Cover Nissan 350z Customization
Need For Speed Payback - Nissan 350Z
(Last Updated On: June 10, 2017)

A lot of people were asking about the Nissan 350z as one of the premiere cars they wanted to race with in the newest Need For Speed game. Ghost Games obliged by adding the car to Need For Speed: Payback, which is like a cross between Burnout: Takedown, The Fast & The Furious and EA’s own The Need For Speed: The Run.

During the EA Play event as part of the E3 2017 festivities, the publishing giant invited a bunch of YouTubers out to Los Angeles to get some hands-on time with the newest racing title. This resulted in plenty of video footage being captured as gamers and YouTube content creators managed to take gamers through the customization process for a few of the vehicles, including the Nissan 350z.

You can check out the first video below, which features commentary from BlackPanthaa, as he discusses the various options and differences between the customization in previous Need For Speed games the latest Need For Speed: Payback.

So one of the really cool features with the customization is that bodykits are now no longer restricted to entire kits. You can actually use parts from different kits to mix and match them and create your own vehicular monstrosity.

While in some previous games you could make certain modifications to the hood, grill, bumper and side-skirts, usually the aftermarket bodykits would simply change the entire physical shape of the car and you couldn’t modify the different parts. This time around you can modify the different parts individually.

For the Nissan 350z we see that there are parts from The Alchemist, official tuner parts from Nissan, Chidori, Americana Automative, Rocket Bunny, Rotiform, Vorsteiner, Fifteen52, Watanabe Racing Service, Speed Hunters, Toyo Tires, Idlers, Stretched, Falken, Voltex Racing, Kumho Tire, and Outlaw Parts & Labour.

BlackPanthaa also discusses that when you raise the Camber and then lower the body of the car it automatically tucks the wheels into the body. You can see more of how the customization works thanks to a non-commentary video provided by GTA Wise Guy, which you can check out below.

If you don’t care about customization but you do care about racing, EA released a new trailer for the game that actually shows how one of the missions play out. They have what they call “Blockbuster” moments that play throughout the segments. They’re basically cinematic style cameras and slow-mo to help tell the story. These segments are interspersed throughout the level, so there’s a lot of broken up gameplay as you move through the story mode. You can see what it looks like in action with the trailer below.

Need For Speed: Payback (or the game that wasn’t quite good enough to be a spin-off of Burnout) will launch on November 10th for the Xbox One, PS4 and PC.


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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.

  • LurkerJK

    They have what they call “Blockbuster” moments that play throughout the
    segments. They’re basically cinematic style cameras and slow-mo to help
    tell the story. These segments are interspersed throughout the level,
    so there’s a lot of broken up gameplay as you move through the story
    mode.

    The presentation during the EA conference was weird, the gameplay slowed down so often to show a a car crashing or a cutscene that it seemed like the barely gets to steer the car for 3 seconds before the next one

    and once the footage ended the dude in the conference said “Don’t worry, it plays as good as it looks” which left me speechless thinking “it did not look good…”

    they wouldn’t go from a game that you can not pause to a game that plays itself … right ? …. right ?

    • It’s EA. They haven’t been good in years.

    • they wouldn’t go from a game that you can not pause to a game that plays itself … right ? …. right ?

      I was also wondering about this…. will they keep the car up to speed for you and steer you coming out of the cut-scenes or will they avoid wresting control from you so you can head back into the level just to crash head-on into oncoming traffic? Because essentially they’ll have to take a lot of control from the player to ensure that the player doesn’t die while all those quick-cuts take place during the actual game.

  • ParasiteX

    Not much of a racing fan. But i really loved the customization mechanics in NFS Undergrounds. And is generally the main thing that draws me to racing games. That or realistic damage physics. But i’m guessing this one, like most other racing games that use real world card models, will not have damage physics. Mainly because the car manufacturers wont allow it.

    • like most other racing games that use real world card models, will not have damage physics. Mainly because the car manufacturers wont allow it.

      I would prefer they go back to using non-real car models so we can get real car damage. Before they started using licensed vehicles, Project CARS had a very promising looking damage model system.

      • ParasiteX

        Indeed. I don’t see the point of having to use licensed cars. In the end i don’t think most players care much about that, and would rather have a more realistic damage model.