Indivisible Announced For Nintendo Switch, Coming 2018
Indivisible Nintendo Switch
(Last Updated On: June 1, 2017)

505 Games and Lab Zero Games announced today that Indivisible, the adventure-RPG from the makers of Skullgirls, will make its way to the Nintendo Switch.

So why is Indivisible coming to Nintendo’s system? Because fans asked for it.

According to Peter Bartholow, CEO of Lab Zero Games, many of their fans begged them for a Switch port, so they obliged. He mentions in the press release…

“Ever since Nintendo announced the Switch, Lab Zero’s fans have been clamoring for Indivisible to come to the platform. Platformers and RPGs are great on the couch or on the go, making our game a great fit for the console. So supporting the Switch was an easy decision,”

 

“The team has been hard at work on Indivisible for more than a year now, and we’re excited to share the progress with our supporters. We wouldn’t be making this game without them, and it’s important that we keep them involved and listen to their feedback to make the game even better.”

Indie developers have been quick to jump onto the Switch bandwagon. AAA publishers? Not so much.

The Switch has been selling out pretty consistently since March 3rd. Nintendo hasn’t been able to keep up with the demand with such a limited supply. Investors have been salivating over the success of the machine, and it’s helped drive up the price of Nintendo’s stock, especially after announcements for games like Monster Hunter XX coming to the Switch with cross-platform compatibility with the Nintendo 3DS.

As for Indivisible, they launched a new trailer to help lure gamers in by cementing it in stone that it’s coming to the Switch. You can check it out below.

Just like the other versions, you’ll be able to get Indivisible on the Switch in collector’s edition that comes in a custom tin box with a plastic slip cover. A physical rendition of the game for the Switch will be packaged inside along with a full color art manual.

The Nintendo Switch version of the game will launch in 2018 alongside the PC, PS4, and Xbox One versions of Indivisible.


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Billy has been rustling Jimmies for years covering video games, technology and digital trends within the electronics entertainment space. The GJP cried and their tears became his milkshake. Need to get in touch? Try the Contact Page.

  • Mr.Towel

    Interesting.

    It seems that porting games to Switch is easy. Most indie developers don’t bother to port a game to a platform, even if they do love that platform, when the porting process would be too much a pain. There’s some exceptions like Retrocity Rampage but they are rare.

    Either Nintendo’s SDK are very user friendly (and this time around they seem to be actually giving easy access to the damn things. At the earlier stages of the Wii U they were snobbing, it was a very painful process to get your hands on one) or the Switch itself is easier to crack around.

    Either way that’s good news, it means easier third party support which always was Nintendo’s weakspot.

    • Both actually. They simplified the SDK to easily hook into many mainstream engines, and they’ve worked with Unity and Epic thanks to their talent development relations officer to allow developers to port to the system almost as easy as a click of a button.

      Essentially if you can make a game in Unreal/Unity for any system, you can make it for the Switch.

      Even for non-traditional engines they’ve designed the pipeline so that it’s very close to software made for x86 platforms.

      • Mr.Towel

        Ohhhh, didn’t know about that.

        Seems Nintendo did a better job at engineering the hardware than Sony/Microsoft did this time around. If I’m not mistaken the Switch uses a Nvidia’s Tegra? It’s probably an ARM like the 3DS and the Vita.

        The problem with going full blown x86 as Sony/Microsoft did is that you lose the only appeal consoles could have over PCs which is dedicated hardware. If your console has a CPU no different than PCs, it’s just a PC. And as consoles goes, they are crap PCs. They will always lose the race if they want to be a PC.

        But you can’t go full dedicated either as was the case with PS2 and the PS3. PS3 suffered a lot on its early life because it’s cell architecture was too complex and required a lot, a fucking lot, of multi-thread coding (X360 also used a “cell” processor, but a simplified one which mixed IBMs PowerPC and cell’s PPE so it was closer to an X86, specially on the instruction set). Most developers fucking hate multi-thread coding, they can barely withstand hyper-threading coding on PC, multi-threading on an alien architecture is a nightmare for them, it’s ten thousand times worse than their linked lists exercises on C at college. This stigma was probably one of the reasons Microsoft and Sony decided to go full x86 with the newer generation.

        Ideally, you have to find a sweetspot between portability and dedicated hardware, so developers can easily port base working version of their games inside the system and mine more interesting performance from its specially designed transistors. ARM is a good option for that. Because ARM itself only sells you the basic engineering plans for the CPU, you have to organize their features yourself if you want to use an ARM on your product. ARMs also use a reduced instruction set so their commands can always be replicated on more complex instruction sets as is the case with x86. ARMs has almost zero expanded instructions and when they have it’s for high level languages like Java, made exactly for portability. It’s obviously sacrifice performance but you can at least very quickly port anything to it right from the start, it gets easier to tune the software after that rather than spending months just to get the game barely running on the board.

        God, I really hope Nintendo’s finds success this time, they seem to be the only ones doing things in the oldschool and right way.

        By the way Billy, there seems to be some info running around about Sony developing a new handheld hardware, against all odds. The stuff I’ve found seems decently credible, with a pinch of salt, but almost no one is reporting on it because nobody cares about the Vita or 3DS anymore. I think you can find some hot leads too if you search around. Mostly from Japanese developers though.

        • The problem with going full blown x86 as Sony/Microsoft did is that you lose the only appeal consoles could have over PCs which is dedicated hardware.

          This is exactly how I feel about both the Xbox One and PS4. If they were going to mimic PCs the least they could do is diversify the software. But almost every game on the two consoles is also on PC! It’s insane. There’s so much redundancy right now between PC, PS4 and Xbox One, but the other two have none of the advantages of PC.

          God, I really hope Nintendo’s finds success this time, they seem to be the only ones doing things in the oldschool and right way.

          Same here. I know the Switch is “weak” comparative to the other two, but it’s a fun little system. And I haven’t had as much fun with game like ARMS since… heck I can’t even remember. A generally fun game is hard to come by these days.

          , there seems to be some info running around about Sony developing a new handheld hardware, against all odds. The stuff I’ve found seems decently credible, with a pinch of salt, but almost no one is reporting on it because nobody cares about the Vita or 3DS anymore. I think you can find some hot leads too if you search around. Mostly from Japanese developers though.

          Awesome, thanks. I’ll take a look into this.